The Six Stages of Inclusion...

Stage 1: Early Inclusion

 

 

  • Intentional, overt exclusion of people from traditionally marginalized groups is present within the organization, including public enforcement of the exclusionary status quo.

  

  • Formal policies, practices, and decision-making systems are established by members of the single dominant group. Change only occurs when interests of both the dominant and marginalized groups are served.

Defining characteristics of

Early Inclusion Organizations

 

 

  • Suppress certain parts of their own identity to fit the mold defined by the organization.

  

  • Are actively excluded in mission, policies and procedures. Are excluded and/or segregated.

Experiences of people from

Traditionally Marginalized Groups

Common traits of people from

Traditionally Dominant Groups

 

 

  • Denies oppression exists and/or overtly discriminates.

  

  • Only supports change if it directly benefits them.

Stage 2: Emerging Inclusion

 

 

  • The organization accepts a limited number of People of Color who do not ruffle any feathers and have "proper" perspective and credentials.

  

  • Other individuals from traditionally marginalized groups are likely excluded despite official policies.

Defining characteristics of

Emerging Inclusion Organizations

 

 

  • Suppress certain parts of their own identity to fit the mold defined by the organization.

  

  • Are actively excluded in mission, policies and procedures. Are excluded and/or segregated.

Experiences of people from

Traditionally Marginalized Groups

Common traits of people from

Traditionally Dominant Groups

 

 

  • Denies oppression exists and/or overtly discriminates.

  

  • Only supports change if it directly benefits them.

Stage 3: Transitional Inclusion

 

 

  • Sees itself as a “woke” and welcoming organization despite only a few members of traditionally marginalized groups holding valued positions. Embrace commonalities over differences.

  

  • Well-intended change stalls when dominant group members become uncomfortable with the introduction of new cultural styles. Instead of nurturing tolerance, efforts focus primarily in symbolic change.

  

Defining characteristics of

Transitional Inclusion Organizations

 

 

  • Suppress certain parts of their own identity to fit the mold defined by the organization.

  

  • Are actively excluded in mission, policies and procedures. Are excluded and/or segregated.

Experiences of people from

Traditionally Marginalized Groups

Common traits of people from

Traditionally Dominant Groups

 

 

  • Denies oppression exists and/or overtly discriminates.

  

  • Only supports change if it directly benefits them.

Stage 4: Intentional Inclusion

 

 

  • Committed to the struggle of tolerating differences in culture, policies and decision-making that true inclusion brings. Change efforts often stall under pushback and uneasiness.

  

  • Past organizational norms are no longer appropriate and new suitable ones have not yet been put into action. Discussions start to investigate differences in perceptions, experiences and impacts.

Defining characteristics of

Intentional Inclusion Organizations

 

 

  • Suppress certain parts of their own identity to fit the mold defined by the organization.

  

  • Are actively excluded in mission, policies and procedures. Are excluded and/or segregated.

Experiences of people from

Traditionally Marginalized Groups

Common traits of people from

Traditionally Dominant Groups

 

 

  • Denies oppression exists and/or overtly discriminates.

  

  • Only supports change if it directly benefits them.

Stage 5: Mindful Inclusion

 

 

  • Differences are recognized as additive. All aspects of the organization are actively examined to identify barriers that impede people's ability to contribute.

  

  • Intentionally carries out restructuring of policies and practices with an inclusive lens, creating power sharing at all levels of the organizational system.

Defining characteristics of

Mindful Inclusion Organizations

 

 

  • Intentional, overt exclusion of people from traditionally marginalized groups is present within the organization, including public enforcement of the exclusionary status quo.

  

  • Formal policies, practices, and decision-making systems are established by members of the single dominant group. Change only occurs when interests of both the dominant and marginalized groups are served.

Experiences of people from

Traditionally Marginalized Groups

Common traits of people from

Traditionally Dominant Groups

 

 

  • Intentional, overt exclusion of

  • Denies oppression exists and/or overtly discriminates.

  •   

  • Only supports change if it directly benefits them.

  • marginalized groups are served.

Stage 6: True Inclusion

 

 

  • Unique and diverse cultures, lifestyles and interests are valued, embraced, and woven throughout all aspects of the organizatio.

  

  • All groups and viewpoints contribute to the formation of culture, policies and decision-making.

Defining characteristics of

True Iclusion Organizations

 

 

  • All identities are valued and supported as full selves, contributing their talents, skill and energies toward accomplishing organizational goals.

  

  • Would confirm that different opinions and points of view are sought out for projects and decisions that shape the organization.

Experiences of people from

Traditionally Marginalized Groups

Common traits of people from

Traditionally Dominant Groups

 

 

  • Intentional, overt exclusion of people from traditionally marginalized groups is present within the organization, including public enforcement of the exclusionary status quo.

  

  • Formal policies, practices, and decision-making systems are established by members of the single dominant group. Change only occurs when interests of both the dominant and marginalized groups are served.

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